Here's What Those Strange Covered Statues Are At Beach And Atlanta

Here's What Those Strange Covered Statues Are At Beach And Atlanta

(Photo by Lauren Lloyd)

UPDATE: Rest easy, Huntington Beach. The statues have been unveiled.

The four mysterious statues at the corner of Beach Boulevard and Atlanta Avenue have perplexed Huntington Beach residents and Starbucks patrons for the past few months—but we now have an answer for these strange effigies, un-artfully sheathed in bubble wrap and trash bags.

According to City of Huntington Beach Associate Planner Hayden Beckman, the statues "are part of a public art installation project that the property management has commissioned for the site."

Approved by the City's Design Review Board (DRB) in 2011 "as a part of the center's architectural enhancement, re-design and addition of a new commercial pad building," the final installation "coincides with the final approval of the new commercial pad building being constructed on the southwest corner of the site."

The statues appear to be complete, aside from, of course, their crude cloaks. But we have an answer for that too.

Beckman explains: "The statues are wrapped at the moment because of a design modification regarding the ground cover. The statues were originally going to be surrounded by a mulch material, and instead the owner and artist have decided to surround the statues instead with sand. This change in the design has led to a few delays, but they anticipate the final reveal of the art installation, including the subject sculptures, in the next few weeks."

The project file shows drawings by Delesprie, world renowned bronze sculptor and artist behind the sculptures, for each figure, which appear to be children playing marine musical instruments, from conch shells to seashell drums, as well as one youngster surfing a stingray. 

There you have it, folks. Now we'll all be able to sleep a little better at night knowing that the figures are indeed public works of art, and that sand is the setback.

This post has been updated to include details on the statues. 

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